Alexa Blog https://blog.alexa.com Thu, 15 Nov 2018 19:13:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.8 Free Marketing Report Template: Make Client Reporting Fast and Easy https://blog.alexa.com/marketing-report-template/ https://blog.alexa.com/marketing-report-template/#respond Thu, 15 Nov 2018 17:59:29 +0000 https://blog.alexa.com/?p=6404 If you’re a marketer who has to report information back to your clients, a marketing report template can make your job much easier. Instead of starting from scratch, you can use the template to quickly plug in the information you need at the end of each month, quarter, or year. When you use a proven [...]

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8 minute read

If you’re a marketer who has to report information back to your clients, a marketing report template can make your job much easier.

Instead of starting from scratch, you can use the template to quickly plug in the information you need at the end of each month, quarter, or year.

When you use a proven and reliable marketing report template, you can save time and be sure that you’re putting together information in a way that will show off the value and quality of your work.

To help you develop your own digital marketing report template, we’ve put together this free download. We’ve also created a guide to help you compile the details and data you need to present your results.

Download our free marketing report template now.

Why You Must Create Regular Marketing Reports

Most marketing clients will request that you send a monthly, quarterly, or annual report that:

  • Outlines the work you’ve done
  • Recognizes where you have succeeded
  • Discusses opportunities to improve

Even if clients don’t require seeing regular marketing reports, you should create them anyway.


Even if clients don’t require seeing regular marketing reports, you should create them anyway.
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There are many benefits to creating regular marketing reports.

  • Proves your value to clients. It’s often difficult for clients to see the results of marketing strategies without looking at data or reports that illustrate progress. Creating regular reports allows you to highlight how the work you’re doing benefits your client. Otherwise, decision-makers may not be able to see the value in your work.
  • Compiles important data in one place. Tracking marketing data can get messy if you don’t have a structured way to regularly collect and organize the information. By creating streamlined marketing reports, you can be sure that you are constantly aggregating the most important information for your client in a reliable place.
  • Helps you see your progress and plan for the future. In marketing, it’s difficult to know if you are meeting your marketing objectives if you don’t have any data or results to back it up. Using a marketing report template makes it possible for you to reflect on past successes, understand strategies that didn’t work, identify trends, and plan for the future based on what you’ve learned.

Regularly compiling marketing data is good for you, your clients, and the marketing plan as a whole. So don’t skip this process. Instead, use a marketing report template to make the process quicker and easier.

Tips for Creating a Valuable Marketing Report

While all marketing reports are important, they are not all equally valuable.

The value of your marketing report depends on how you collect and present information.  To make sure you create the most useful and relevant report, follow these tips, which are also reflected in our marketing report template.


The value of your marketing report depends on how you collect and present information.
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Download our free marketing report template now.

Know your audience. Like great marketing copy, great marketing reports speak to a specific audience. Create it with your audience in mind, and remember that the way you put together your marketing report will be different if you’re preparing it for someone who is a Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) or a flower shop owner. The CMO will understand industry jargon and concepts that may be unfamiliar to the small business owner. It’s likely their goals will be different as well. Know your audience and write for their skill level and understanding of marketing.

Give context to numbers. Numbers help give concrete value to marketing results. But numbers are only useful if there is context to explain what they represent. When you include numbers, also explain the story behind the data.

  • Compare numbers to previous time frames (compare current data to last month’s data, last year’s data, etc.)
  • Compare numbers to competitor performance (show how your brand’s stats match up to other companies)
  • Compare numbers to industry averages (show how your brand’s stats match up to your industry as a whole)

Refer back to your goals. Most clients care about one thing when looking at a marketing report – seeing progress toward goals. Clients want to see results that show you’re advancing toward the goals you set. Help them see how your work is making progress by presenting your data alongside your goals, and focus on information that is relevant to the goals you set with the client at the beginning.


Most clients care about one thing when looking at a marketing report – seeing progress toward goals.
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Use tools that make the process easier. As a marketer, your time should be primarily spent creating marketing campaigns – not creating reports. So leverage a variety of marketing plan tools to help you be more efficient in each step of the process. Download our marketing report template to get started and then use the other tools and resources mentioned in this post to make it easier to collect and compile information for your reports.

10 Things to Include in a Marketing Report Template

As you create your first marketing report template, remember that what you end up sending each client will be different based on:

  • The tasks assigned to you. Our marketing report template covers a broad spectrum of marketing tasks. You may only be responsible for some of the tasks, so only include what is relevant. For example, don’t include a section on social media if you’re only working on SEO copywriting.
  • The goals of your campaigns. Just as you don’t need to include sections on tasks you’re not working on, you may be able to exclude or minimize sections that aren’t directly tied to your primary or secondary goals.
  • Client preferences. Each client may have their own preferences for how they want to receive reports from you. When necessary, make changes to cater to their requests.

Use the sections outlined in this marketing report template as a guide. But always think about what you can alter, delete, or add that would make your report more relevant to your role, goals, and client.

1. Opening Summary Highlights

Open your digital marketing report by highlighting the most important takeaways from the document. Do this so your client can get all of the top-level information they need about your report on the first page.

  • Include five to 10 insights that your report exposes. Insights may include key results, challenges, and plans for the future.
  • Highlight major key performance indicators (KPIs). If you previously identified the most important metrics for your client’s marketing plan, include a section highlighting those (with comparisons to the past).

2. Goals and Current Plan

Before you dive into the details, remind the client about what you’re working on and why. Recap the goals you’ve set, along with the plans you’ve outlined for reaching those goals. Also, mention the research you’ve conducted to set your goals and guide your plans. Refreshing the client’s mind will help you prime them for the next few pages of information you’re about to provide.

Where to get the data: If you need to conduct research on your audience, competitors, or industry, use our buyer persona template, sites for market research, and guide on how to do market research.

3. Marketing Budget

Another important item to review before getting into the details of the report is a recap of the marketing budget. Highlight your current budget and a breakdown of how that budget was spent throughout the time period of the marketing report for each initiative or department. If you’re creating a budget from scratch, use this marketing budget template to help you get started.

4. Conversion Metrics

The marketing report template is set up to put the most important information near the beginning of the report, which is why conversion metrics are in the first section. Conversions give clients a clear indicator of how well the marketing plan is working. They can see data on how many actions are being taken by users, customers, and clients. Conversion data may include:

  • Leads by channel (websites, social media, referrals, paid search, email marketing, offline sources, etc.)
  • Revenue
  • Customer acquisition
  • Cost per conversion on paid channels (paid search, social promotions, native advertising, etc.)
  • Paid leads vs. organic leads

Where to get the data: Depending on your client’s industry, you may need to work with someone on their team to get details regarding their sales and revenue. If they offer online sales, you can pull this data from their e-commerce sales reports. For paid search, you can use reports within those accounts to get details. With Google Ads, set up goals to collect conversion data.

5. Website Metrics

The next section of your digital marketing report template should relate to one of your largest marketing assets – the client website. Present web analytics such as:

  • Page views
  • Unique users
  • Bounce rates
  • Breakdown of traffic sources (organic, paid, social, referral)
  • Top pages
  • Top referrers
  • Top linking pages

Where to get the data: These data sets are available in the Google Analytics account tied to the client site or in Alexa’s Agency plan.

6. SEO Metrics

Next, include details about the site’s SEO improvements. Share details that will help the client see how well their site performs in organic search and outline how you’re continuing to boost traffic and ranks using three types of SEO: on-page, technical, and off-site SEO. Include:

  • New pages of content published on the client’s site
  • Inbound links (how many sites link back to the client’s site)
  • Alexa Rank (which indicates site authority)
  • Position in search rankings for target keywords
  • Site audit results (which shows performance on technical elements such as broken links, site security, site speed, site structure, etc.)

Where to get the data:

Use the Site Overview tool to find the number of sites linking to the client’s site as well their Alexa Rank.

find sites linking in for marketing report template

Use the Site Keyword tool to get details about the top keywords driving traffic to the client’s site and the percentage of share of voice they have in search.

marketing report with keyword share of voice

Use the SEO Audit tool to report on the technical performance of the site. With Alexa’s Agency plan, you can run 2 audits per site, per month (up to 35 sites).

include site audit grade in marketing report template

7. PPC Metrics

Your monthly marketing report template should recap organic search results as well as paid search performance. If you’re running paid ads for PPC lead generation, create a section that outlines your results and budget.

  • Ad spend
  • ROI
  • Cost per conversion (CPC)
  • Click-through rate (CTR)
  • Impressions

Where to get the data: All of this information is available within a client’s Google Ads account.

8. Social Media Metrics

Create a report on the progress made through social media marketing and influencer marketing strategies. Pull data related to all of the client’s active social media profiles. Separate them by channel and include:

  • Followers
  • Shares
  • Mentions and comments
  • Referral traffic
  • Top-performing content

Where to get the data: Data regarding followers and shares can be collected through insight reports on the client’s social media profiles. Use Google Analytics to find information regarding traffic sent to the client’s site from each social media network.

9. Email Metrics

If the client is using email to connect with customers and nurture leads through the marketing funnel, include a section on email marketing. Include insights as they relate to:

  • Email campaigns sent
  • Traffic
  • Open rate
  • Click-through rate
  • Conversions
  • Bounce rate
  • New subscribers
  • Unsubscribes
  • Total subscribers

Where to get the data: Pull these data by creating reports within your email marketing software.

10. Goals and Plans

Finally, end your marketing report with a summary and look at the future. Recap any highlights that were mentioned at the beginning of the report, and include any takeaways that can help clarify future plans.

If your plans are changing based on what you learned in the report, let the client know what will be different next month and how you are adjusting based on what you’ve learned. Feature goals that were met, and outline future plans.

Download Our Free Marketing Report Template

Creating marketing reports may not be the most fun or exciting part of a marketing job, but it’s a critical task you can’t avoid.


Creating marketing reports may not be the most fun or exciting part of a marketing job, but it’s a critical task you can’t avoid.
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Marketing reports help you keep track of your data and progress, prove your value to your clients, and create more informed and strategic marketing campaigns.

Use our free marketing report template to simplify and streamline the process. Then, sign up for a free trial of Alexa’s Agency plan to get access to tools that will make it easy to complete and deliver marketing reports that prove the value of your work.

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The Insider’s Guide to PPC Keyword Research https://blog.alexa.com/ppc-keyword-research/ https://blog.alexa.com/ppc-keyword-research/#respond Mon, 12 Nov 2018 18:18:11 +0000 https://blog.alexa.com/?p=6391 So, you’re about to figure out which keywords to target in Google Ads (formerly known as Google AdWords) with ppc keyword research. But how do you do it effectively? Our agency has experience running large Google ads accounts while also owning SEO content strategy, so we’ve done our fair share of keyword research. And the [...]

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9 minute read

So, you’re about to figure out which keywords to target in Google Ads (formerly known as Google AdWords) with ppc keyword research. But how do you do it effectively?

Our agency has experience running large Google ads accounts while also owning SEO content strategy, so we’ve done our fair share of keyword research. And the truth about paid keyword research is that it’s part art and part science. By understanding its nuances, you can minimize the fear of missed keywords and feel confident you’ve uncovered the most valuable opportunities.

The difference between organic and PPC keyword research

Most novices make the mistake of treating organic and paid search keyword research the same. What’s the big difference? You’re targeting keywords people search for either way, right? Why not just throw all your ideas into a PPC keyword research tool and call it a day?

First, there’s a distinct difference in intent. Organic keywords typically attract leads in the top or middle of funnel since they’re informational rather than transactional, buying keywords.

“Ready-to-purchase” or buying keywords work well for PPC because they convert better than informational keywords. (Think “buy Nike shoes” rather than “top ten Nike shoes this year” or “most fashionable Nike shoes”). Therefore, keywords that demonstrate a high buyer intent are more affordable for PPC because you can cover the costs more easily by making sales.

It’s difficult to convert traffic from informational keywords in PPC because the traffic isn’t ready. You often need layers of nurturing before a conversion happens, which can be tricky to get right. Testing out well-structured nurturing and retargeting campaigns can take a good amount of time and money, and success isn’t guaranteed. Higher-funnel nurturing is often where organic keywords work well because you can affordably build out pages and rank for these keywords.

While PPC keyword research strategy and SEO keyword research strategy can converge, they are never the same. The intersection of keywords usually occurs in the middle of the funnel, around words or phrases that indicate users are ready to give their contact info or, better yet, move forward with a purchase. Certain types of pages convert best for these keywords depending on the channel. For PPC, it’s usually an opt-in page or product page, and for SEO, it’s usually a service or product page.


While PPC keyword research strategy and SEO keyword research strategy can converge, they are never the same.
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So, what are the consequences of treating both types of keyword research the same? You can:

  • Waste a lot of money on ads that never convert.
  • Miss out on profitable keywords you didn’t consider targeting.
  • Waste a lot of time ranking for pages that don’t make sense for the buyer in that phase of the marketing funnel.

To be clear, PPC is best for targeting purchase-ready buyers because conversions are more likely to happen, which helps fund the ad budget. Organic keywords are generally better for high- to mid-purchase funnel prospects looking for topics in the awareness and research phases to build trust and brand recognition.

For more information on the differences between paid and organic strategies, read the post: SEM vs. SEO: What’s the Difference and Which is Right for My Brand?

Now, let’s cover what you can do to make your PPC keyword research as effective as possible.

7 tips for more effective PPC keyword research

So, now you know there’s a right and wrong way when figuring out how to research keywords for Google Ads. As mentioned, you should start with low-funnel keywords. But what else can you do to optimize your PPC research process?

1. Use the latest tools.

There are free keyword research tools that will give you a variety of keyword ideas based on a seed keyword you enter, such as Keywordtool.io and Ubersuggest. There are also free concatenation tools that will automatically return all the possible variations of keywords based on the adjectives and nouns you enter, which is great for industries that have a lot of geo-modifiers or descriptors in their search terms. For instance, you may want all the variations for local search terms that’ll lead to your pizza chain, such as “stuffed-crust pizza Maryland,” “pan pizza Washington DC,” or “fast-delivery pizza Virginia.”

You can also use premium tools to identify what keywords competitor pages rank for organically and target with PPC. This is a good way to uncover the terms competitors feel are viable enough to test or target.

Use Alexa’s Competitor Keyword Matrix to find paid keyword gaps that competitors get traffic for, but you don’t. For this tool, we recommend starting with high-intent, buyer keywords to reach purchase-ready customers and boost PPC lead generation.

Alexa ppc keyword research tool

2. Align keywords with content.

To build out your PPC research properly from scratch, begin with the end in mind. Look at the landing page and other content you will be sending people to and brainstorm ideas from there. When thinking about how to choose keywords for PPC, make sure your content (landing pages, offers, etc.) aligns strongly with the keywords you select to increase the chances you’ll show up in a desirable spot and get prospects to convert. In turn, strong keyword/content alignment will also help improve your quality score, cost per conversion, CTR, and other metrics.


To build out your PPC research properly from scratch, begin with the end in mind.
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Ask yourself what problems your ideal customer has and what they search for when they’re ready to purchase. Use tools and creative thinking to identify the keywords and check if they have detectable search volume. Add the relevant keywords with suitable volume to your strategy. Then, slowly work up to lower-intent, higher-funnel keywords to round out your holistic keyword research strategy.

3. Leverage the Search Terms report to find new keywords to target.

Great PPC keyword research doesn’t stop with the selection. Iteratively testing your theories against data is key to becoming a seasoned PPC expert. Even us veterans sometimes find out that keywords we thought would be great aren’t bringing in the right traffic or converting into sales.

To help you test keyword effectiveness, Google Ads lets you figure out the exact words people searched to find your ad. Once you’re in the interface, click into the Campaign and/or Ad Group you want, then click the Keywords button on the left sidebar, and then, click Search Terms on the top navigation menu.

google search terms report

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This Search Terms report is outstanding because it helps you understand the effectiveness of the keywords you target. You can look for and observe patterns to figure out which keywords drive traffic and with what type of intent. Since PPC keywords are often longer-tail, it’s clearer what searchers were looking for, which helps you understand their true intentions. For example, someone may search “I want a radio-controlled XLR drone,” which makes it clear that they probably don’t want to buy the XLR microphones you’re selling.

Use the junk keywords that come up to identify the types of keywords  you should steer away from. Often, you’ll discover that some keywords used are too broad, which means you’ll have to get more specific with targeting or you must add negative keywords to filter out irrelevant traffic.

As mentioned, acronyms and brand names are a hotspot for diverging intent. That’s because the same word can represent different companies or products. For example, XLR may stand for a microphone cable or drone. Therefore, you should deeply examine short, broad keywords first to anticipate overlap. Once identified, you can tailor your keyword targeting and/or ad copy to attract the right prospects, rather than unqualified ones. Similarly, you can uncover keywords you never considered targeting that convert well and/or get high click-through rates.

4. Use the paid and organic reports in Google Ads.

Chances are you already have pages ranking organically for keywords. Google Search Console, a free tool, will tell you the exact keywords you rank for. Look at these keywords for inspiration to fill in any holes in your PPC keyword research strategy or find keywords to build off. Once again, make sure to stay low-funnel.

Working together with the search engine optimization side is crucial to having an aligned, holistic strategy. Brainstorm with your SEO expert or build both keyword strategies yourself if you understand both skillsets well.

Google Ads has a helpful, new feature that helps easily identify whether the organic version of your paid keywords are driving any conversions and vice versa. Once you link Search Console to Google Ads, you get access to the paid and organic report in the navigation menu at the top of the interface under Reports > Predefined reports > Basic > Paid & Organic.

organic and paid keywords report

Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google LLC, used with permission.

As you can see in the picture below, Google Ads shows you organic and paid performance of each individual keyword.

organic and paid keyword performance report

Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google LLC, used with permission.

With Search Console and the Paid and Organic report, you may even find hot, new product benefits that you never considered positioning your product around. For example, you may be selling hypoallergenic laundry detergent, but you may find that people search and convert through keywords like, “laundry detergent that cleans up grass stains.”

5. Don’t rely on tools alone. Talk to real people, too.

Tools are valuable but don’t rely on them solely to flesh out your keyword list. Sometimes, the best way of uncovering search gems is to know your business, industry, prospects, and customers better than anyone else. And there’s no better way to find out what people are searching for than from real people looking for or already using your solution. They’ll describe the problems and motives they’re concerned with at a level of detail you can’t find elsewhere.

Like tools, use real human input as a supplement rather than a stand-alone resource.

Pro Tip: Sometimes people can’t remember what they searched for to end up on your site. To help guide the conversation, focus your questions on the problems to be solved and feelings or thoughts they had rather than what they searched.

6. Don’t give up too soon if a keyword isn’t working.

Imagine this scenario. A keyword you’re targeting with Google Ads isn’t converting or getting clicks. Does that mean you pause the keyword after giving it a good amount of time and traffic? Not necessarily.

Poor performance can have many causes that don’t have to do with a keyword being irrelevant or unprofitable. Before you declare a keyword unsuccessful, follow these conversion rate optimization best practices to ensure you’ve optimized your ad copy or landing page both for quality score and to get people to take the action. Similarly, there may be technical reasons it’s not converting or getting clicks, like:

  • the reach isn’t high enough because the budget is too low
  • a frequency cap is in place, or
  • the terms don’t get enough traffic

7. Don’t forget about branded keyword variations.

Brand name searches are often forgotten during keyword research for PPC campaigns since people assume they own the organic rankings already. Even if it looks like you rank first, you need to prevent competitors from usurping the top spot with their ads. It’s good practice to maximize the search results page “real estate” on your branded terms and show up for misspellings of your brand name (especially those you don’t rank well for).

Sometimes, brand keywords are the most overlooked and profitable keyword variations because you can purchase them more affordably than competitors. Since your brand name is throughout the site and usually part of the root domain, this naturally increases relevance, results in higher quality scores, and better paid performance. Combine the techniques mentioned with common sense to figure out whether certain misspellings are worth targeting — some will be, and some won’t.

Bonus tips for maximizing your PPC results

Hungry for more? There is almost always room to continue the keyword hunt. These tips will help you stay ahead.

Maximize search results space with this tip.

Target the same keywords with organic and paid to take up more of the space on the first page. The more “real estate” you own, the higher the chance searchers will click your listing, which means more traffic. You can do this with both brand and non-brand keywords.

Paid and organic research should be treated differently, but there are moments when keyword overlaps create golden opportunities to maximize your results. Where appropriate, leverage the keywords that matter to both PPC and SEO strategies for the highest impact.

Integrate PPC and SEO.

PPC keyword research is different from organic research, but that doesn’t mean you should silo SEO and PPC employees. Have both sides share their data and communicate often during the process. Better yet, have the same person checking in on both sides (but only if they understand both PPC and SEO well).

Communication between departments helps you sense new trends and find subtopics you might’ve missed, improving the intent of both channels. Little insights, such as discovering a relevant keyword doesn’t convert, are sometimes just what the other side needs to make a tweak that can enhance results. The whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

Optimize your PPC keyword research strategy

Paid search keyword research is an often-overlooked art form. By understanding how to research with more care and tact, you can avoid missed sales. Moreover, great PPC keyword research can help you continue to tailor your keywords, ads, and landing pages. You can iteratively hone the customer journey towards the highest possible ROI.

To succeed, start by finding high-intent, purchase-ready keywords using premium or free PPC keyword research tools to get a thorough sense of the search marketplace. Then, test with data and communicate between SEO and PPC departments.

Ready to find your next PPC keyword opportunity? Sign up for a free trial of Alexa’s Advanced plan to get access to keyword research tools like the Competitor Keyword Matrix, and much more.

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How to Find Long Tail Keywords: A Complete Guide https://blog.alexa.com/how-to-find-long-tail-keywords/ https://blog.alexa.com/how-to-find-long-tail-keywords/#respond Thu, 08 Nov 2018 17:03:19 +0000 https://blog.alexa.com/?p=6365 When creating an SEO plan, it may be tempting to find high-volume keywords to target in your content. But incorporating low-volume, low-competition keywords into your strategy can be extremely powerful. Learn how to find long tail keywords so you can cut through the noise and reach your most qualified customers with topics they care about [...]

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9 minute read

When creating an SEO plan, it may be tempting to find high-volume keywords to target in your content. But incorporating low-volume, low-competition keywords into your strategy can be extremely powerful. Learn how to find long tail keywords so you can cut through the noise and reach your most qualified customers with topics they care about most.

What Are Long Tail Keywords?

Long tail keywords are search phrases that are specific, targeted, and have low search volume. Unlike high-volume, generic keywords that focus on a broad topic, long tail keywords refer to a distinct subset of that topic. These niche keywords are usually three or more words long.

Even though long tail keywords have a lower search volume than broad keywords, they are usually less competitive, which makes them easier to rank for. And because long tail keywords target more specific traffic, they usually have better conversion rates than generic keywords.


Because long tail keywords target more specific traffic, they usually have better conversion rates.
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When you understand how to find long tail keywords, you can uncover golden opportunities to connect with your target audience by providing them the answers and information they value most.

Long Tail Keywords Examples

Consider the broad search term “running shoes.” Long tail keyword examples for that generic term may include:

  • Best running shoes for women
  • Best long distance running shoes 2018
  • Best running shoes for flat feet
  • Road running shoes on trail
  • Running shoes for bad knees

A small or medium-size brand may find it difficult to stand out or rank for the generic search term “running shoes” because it would compete with huge companies that have more authority in search and bigger budgets for SEO and SEM.

long tail keyword example

Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google LLC, used with permission.

But small to medium-size brands can still compete with leading brands and show up on the first page of search results by targeting more specific, long tail keywords.

With these niche keywords, it’s also easier to infer the intent of the searcher. In other words, it’s more clear what they are looking for when using a particular search term.

For example, a searcher who uses the phrase “running shoes” could be looking to buy running shoes, research certain running shoes, or find answers about running shoes. But if a searcher uses the phrase “running shoes for bad knees,” it’s safe to assume they are looking to find a comfortable running shoe that supports their knee joints.

When you understand what a searcher is looking for, you can create more targeted content that satisfies intent and performs better in search.

long tail keyword examples in search

Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google LLC, used with permission.

How to Find Long Tail Keywords: 9 Simple Strategies

As you learn how to find long tail keywords, try the following strategies and long tail keywords tools to find the terms that will drive the most targeted traffic to your site.

1. Use Google autofill.

An incredibly simple way to find long tail keywords is to enter a search term into Google. Study the long tail keywords that appear to understand what niche topics people search for. Use these as target keywords in content, or as seed phrases to research even more long tail keyword opportunities.

how to find long tail keywords with auto-suggest

Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google LLC, used with permission.

2. Look at Google’s related searches.

Another great way to find long tail keywords free is by using Google related searches. This will show you additional variations of a broad search term. Type a keyword into Google, then scroll down to the bottom of the page to find related keywords.

find long tail keywords using related search

Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google LLC, used with permission.

3. Use Ubersuggest.

Another tool that can help you find long tail terms is Ubersuggest. Enter your term to receive a list of the top associated long tail keywords.

find niche keywords

4. Use the LSI Graph Keyword Generator.

The LSI Graph Keyword Generator is not positioned specifically as a tool for finding long tail keywords. Instead, it is marketed as a tool for helping with semantic SEO and uncovering latent semantic indexing (LSI) keywords.

LSI keywords are terms and phrases that are similar to a target keyword. They are often used in on-page SEO to support the main keyword and help give context to the page so that search engines can better understand and rank the content.

However, once you know how to find long tail keywords and what to look for, you can use the tool to generate a list of niche keywords related to your topic of interest.

long tail keyword tools

Learn other ways to find LSI keywords in this post: How to Find LSI Keywords: 5 Easy Strategies.

5. Use Alexa’s Keyword Difficulty tool.

If you have a broad search term in mind, go deeper into that keyword to find long tail keywords that are related to that topic.

To uncover more terms related to your target generic term, use Alexa’s Keyword Difficulty tool. Start with the basic topic that you are looking to cover, and enter the term into the search field.

long tail keyword search

The tool will provide a report of dozens of related keywords, including long tail opportunities. The keywords are also given qualifying metrics to help you determine the best phrases to target.

  • Relevance shows how closely the term is tied to your original target keyword.
  • Popularity shows how frequently the term is searched for.
  • Competition estimates how difficult it will be to rank for the term.

Use these metrics to help you find the best keywords that are closely tied to your original topic.

6. Use Alexa’s Competitor Keyword Matrix.

Another smart way to find long tail keywords is to look for keyword gaps using Alexa’s Competitive Keyword Matrix. You can use the tool to run a competitor keyword analysis to see what long tail keywords your competitors are getting traffic for but you are not. Alternatively, you can use the tool to find popular keywords your competitors aren’t getting traffic for yet that you can target to get ahead of the game.

Step No. 1: Enter up 10 websites into Alexa’s Competitive Keyword Matrix. Select the keyword cluster view. The tool produces a map that helps you find popular topics and keywords. It creates clusters of related keywords that are driving traffic to the sites included in your query.

how to find long tail keywords and topics

The size of the bubble indicates how many keywords exist within the group and the color of the bubble indicates the average popularity of the keyword group.

Pro Tip: If you don’t know your competitors, start by using Alexa’s Audience Overlap tool to find them. Enter one site URL to receive a list of other sites that share a similar audience to the target site.

Step No. 2: Select a keyword cluster from the map. This step will move you deeper into the cluster and provide another map with more specific terms. You can find keywords for website or blog content by drilling into topics/subtopics to find variations of a root keyword or phrase.

how to find long tail keywords with Alexa

Step No. 3: View individual keyword data. Once you find a topic/subtopic you like, scroll down and view the table of keyword results.

find long tail keyword opportunities

Step No. 4: Use the list to identify long tail keyword opportunities. The list of results should include several long tail keyword options you can target. You can focus on keywords very few competitors have targeted by sorting the Sites column from least to most, or use the keyword gaps filter to find new content opportunities your competitors are getting traffic for but you aren’t.

7. Look for questions on Answer the Public.

Long tail keywords are often question queries that include a broad search term. So one way to find long tail keywords is to look for questions that your audience is asking related to that topic or keyword.

To find questions your audience asks about a particular topic, use Answer the Public. Enter your search term and find dozens of question variations that include the broad keyword.

how to find long tail keywords using Answer the Public

You can also view long tail keywords that are prepositions (ex. running shoes without mesh) or comparison variations (ex. running shoes vs. racing flats).

8. Look for user-generated questions on Quora.

Another site to use to find questions that include your topic or keyword is the Q&A site Quora. On Quora, each question is searchable by topic, so you can use it to find popular questions that people are asking about your term.

Enter your topic or keyword to find popular questions that may include long tail keyword opportunities. These questions are usually great ideas for evergreen content on your site.

Quora isn’t the only place to find user-generated questions. You can learn how to find long tail keywords using other top Q&A sites such as Answers.com and Yahoo Answers.

9. See what people are talking about on forums.

You can also look at online conversations to see what customers want to know about certain topics. By browsing forums, you can discover popular topics and long tail keywords.

To find forums of people talking about your topic, search for “[your generic search term] + forum.” This will return search results of forums about the topic. Use these results to identify other seed search terms and long tail keywords based on the most popular conversations related to the issue.

How to Use Long Tail Keywords

Once you know how to find long tail keywords, you need to know how to use them to get the best results for your SEO strategy.

Research and Qualify Long Tail Keywords

Start by researching and qualifying keywords to see how much value they can bring to your search strategy. The best long tail keywords have a good amount of search interest and low competition.


The best long tail keywords have a good amount of search interest and low competition.
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To research and qualify long tail keywords, run them through Alexa’s Keyword Difficulty tool. Look for terms that:

  • Are low competition keywords that you can compete with. There’s no point in targeting terms that are so competitive that you won’t be able to get ahead of them.
  • Are popular and frequently searched for. While the search volume will be lower than a generic term, you still want there to be enough queries to drive traffic to your site.

Optimize for Long Tail Keywords

After you know how to find long tail keywords and qualify them, you need to learn how to use them on your site. Use the following on-page SEO best practices to properly use long tail keywords in your content and improve a page’s ability to rank for the phrase.

  • Use the long tail keyword in the post title and meta title.
  • Use the long tail keyword in the SEO meta description for the page.
  • Use the long tail keyword in the first paragraph of your content.
  • Use the long tail keyword naturally in your post to create a keyword density of about 2%.
  • Use the long tail keyword in at least one subheading.
  • Use the long tail keyword near the end of the content.
  • Use the long tail keyword as an image alt tag on one of the images on the page.
  • Use three to four LSI keywords in the content that are related to the long tail keyword.
  • Create internal links on other pages of your site that lead to the new content.

By following these keyword optimization tactics, your content will be well organized and crawlable for search engines, which will improve your site’s ability to rank.

To make sure you’ve followed all of the best practices for on-page SEO, run your page through Alexa’s On-Page SEO Checker to get a report on optimization opportunities you may have missed.

optimize long tail keywords with Alexa

Start Finding the Best Long Tail Keywords Now

Broad search terms may have a high search volume, but that doesn’t mean focusing your SEO strategy around them will help you rank or drive more traffic or conversions. Generic search terms are highly competitive, difficult to rank for, and not very effective at driving targeted traffic. Instead of focusing all of your SEO energy on targeting those terms, search for long tail keywords that can help you create more focused content that connects with your ideal audience.

Learn how to find long tail keywords and use them effectively in your SEO plans to drive more qualified traffic and boost conversions. To find long tail keywords free, sign up for a free trial of Alexa’s Advanced plan. You’ll get access to keyword, SEO, and competitive analysis tools that can help you find the best keyword opportunities for your site.

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Use This Marketing Budget Template to Track Every Marketing Dollar https://blog.alexa.com/marketing-budget-template/ https://blog.alexa.com/marketing-budget-template/#respond Thu, 01 Nov 2018 15:29:27 +0000 https://blog.alexa.com/?p=6353 From content and design to website and social media management to public relations and live events, a marketing strategy has many moving parts. It includes dozens of tasks, tools, and expenses, which is why it can be difficult to monitor the money it takes to execute. But when you use a marketing budget template, it’s [...]

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7 minute read

From content and design to website and social media management to public relations and live events, a marketing strategy has many moving parts. It includes dozens of tasks, tools, and expenses, which is why it can be difficult to monitor the money it takes to execute. But when you use a marketing budget template, it’s easy to keep an eye on your plans and finances.

A marketing budget template that outlines every expense in your marketing department offers a variety of benefits for your business.

  • It helps you align your investments to your marketing plan. You can allocate funds to the projects that support your top priorities each month, quarter, and year.
  • It helps you reflect and improve. When you closely track your marketing financials and compare to your performance, you can see trends of what is working and what is not. These insights can help you improve your marketing and create better results.
  • It helps you stay on track with your budget and objectives. A defined budget helps you avoid overspending or wasting resources on the wrong things. When each dollar is accounted for, you can effectively monitor your spending and create accurate projections for the future.

So stop guessing about how much money you should and actually do spend on your marketing strategies. Download our free marketing budget template to start projecting and tracking your expenses.


Stop guessing how much money you should and actually do spend on your marketing strategies.
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The rest of this post will review ideas for how to prepare a marketing budget and fill it with the most accurate information.

Types of Marketing Budgets

The categories and details included in your marketing budget template will depend on the size of your budget and the goals of your marketing department. Here are a few different types of budgets you might track marketing expenses for:

  • Annual marketing overview
  • Branding budget
  • Paid advertising budget
  • Public relations budget
  • Website development/redesign budget
  • Website management budget
  • SEO budget
  • Content marketing budget
  • Social media marketing budget
  • Event budget
  • Miscellaneous budget

Note that as you go through each section and type of budget, you’ll see line items that can work in more than one category. These items aren’t set in stone. Group line items in the sections that make the most sense for your business, and remove the expenses for tasks your business doesn’t use.

Annual Marketing Overview

An annual marketing budget template tracks the spending of your entire marketing department for the year. It includes line items for each marketing area as well as any special or one-off projects. This report is an essential marketing budget template for small businesses and large, enterprise businesses alike, as it gives an overview of every marketing expense.

Within the annual marketing budget, you may break down sections and create more specific budgets for individual marketing categories, or you can group items in broader buckets. It’s really a matter of your personal preference and the diversity of expenses you need to plan for.

Branding Budget

The branding section of your marketing budget includes the costs that help you create and establish your brand. These expenses are tied to marketing objectives that develop your brand identity, logos, and positioning in your industry and share it with your audience and customers.

  • Design
  • Photography
  • Video
  • Printing
  • Equipment
  • Tools/Software

Paid Advertising Budget

Your paid advertising budget includes any expenses related to paid promotion on search, social, display, or traditional ads. These expenses should also include the costs associated with creating and launching the ads. This portion of expenses may include creative costs, tools, or fees to agencies for the management or execution of your ad campaigns, in addition to the actual amount spent on the ads.

  • Digital Ads
    • Paid Search (PPC)
    • Display Ads
    • Retargeting Ads
  • Social Media Ads
    • Facebook
    • Instagram
    • Pinterest
    • LinkedIn
    • Twitter
  • Traditional Ads
    • Print
    • Billboards
    • TV
    • Radio
    • Direct Mail
  • Execution
    • Creative
    • Agency/Management
    • Tools/Software

Public Relations Budget

In your marketing budget template, include a section for public relations if your brand is engaging in both in-person and media outreach. This section of the marketing budget will list any expenses with growing your brand visibility, getting more publicity, guest blogging outreach, and securing other partnerships.

  • Sponsorships
  • Content
    • Press Releases
    • Sponsored Content
    • Guest Posting
  • Attending Events
    • Tickets
    • Travel
    • Lodging
    • Per Diems
  • Agency Fees
  • Execution
    • Creative
    • Management
    • Tools/Software

Website Development/Redesign Budget

If your marketing strategies include launching a new website or doing ongoing work on your existing site, add a section for this in your budget. Include the costs it will take to both plan your website updates as well as execute the work.

  • User Experience (UX)
  • Design
  • Development
  • Content Strategy
  • SEO Strategy

Website Management Budget

When you have an established website, you also need to include a section for it in your marketing budget template. In this area, track the amount of money it takes to keep your site up and running even if you aren’t making any significant changes to the UX or design.

  • Domain Registration
  • Web Hosting
  • Maintenance/Security

SEO Budget

Whether you have a brand new website or an existing site, your annual budget should include a section for SEO budget items. If you’re just learning how to start SEO, this budget will likely be higher than if you have an established site with strong rankings. Include costs for all the types of SEO, and the SEO tools, you use.

  • Keyword Research
  • On-Page SEO
  • Off-Site SEO
  • Local SEO
  • Tools/Software

Content Marketing Budget

The content marketing section of your budget will track the content you create for each stage of your purchase funnel. Track expenses as they relate to the copy creation as well as the design and production of the content. Also use this section to track the cost of sponsoring posts, working with influencers, and leveraging guest blogging opportunities.

  • Content Production
    • Blog Posts
    • Landing Pages
    • Emails
    • Case Studies
    • Whitepapers
    • E-Books
    • Videos
    • Downloads (Guides, Checklists, etc.)
  • Sponsored Posts
  • Influencer promotions
  • Tools/Software

Social Media Marketing Budget

The next section of your budget relates to social media marketing. This budget is tied to the costs associated with content development and promotion of marketing resources, plus any costs of your influencer marketing strategy and sponsored posts.

Note that in this marketing budget template, costs for social media ads are not included. They are line items in the paid advertising section. You can work to make this template your own and move sections as they make sense for your business. For example, if you post ads with a variety of providers both online and off, you may want to track those expenses together in the ads section. But if you focus almost solely on social media marketing, you may want to move it into this section.

  • Content Development
  • Graphics
  • Videos
  • Influencers
  • Sponsored Posts
  • Agency Fees
  • Tools/Software

Event Budget

If your brand is hosting one or more events for the year, use this section of your marketing budget template to track these expenses. Track both the costs of putting on the event as well as what you will need to spend to get employees to the event and provide accommodations while they are there.

  • Venue
    • Hall Rental
    • Furniture
    • Equipment
    • Decorations
    • Signage
  • Refreshments
    • Drinks
    • Food
  • Speakers
    • Speaker Fees
    • Speaker Travel
    • Speaker Accommodation
  • Staff
    • Overtime
    • Staff Travel
    • Staff Accommodation
  • Materials
    • Badges
    • Programs
    • Swag

Miscellaneous

There are often expenses your brand will incur that don’t fit naturally into any of the categories of the marketing budget template. You may also have expenses that are unique to your brand, industry, or company values. When that happens, include these special items in a miscellaneous category. A few of the items that may pop up in this section include the following:

  • Philanthropy
  • Agency Fees
  • Any Special Projects

Use a Variety of Timelines to Track Your Marketing Budget

When you build out your marketing budget template, list each of your individual expenses by line. This information helps you see exactly how much you are spending on each item.

To get a better look at the expenses for each task and tool, break up the sections to show how much you spent based on time frames. Most marketing budgets track the total expenses as they relate to:

  • Month
  • Quarter
  • Year

Track Both Your Planned Budget and Actual Marketing Expenses

Your marketing budget shouldn’t only track the estimated amount of money you plan to spend. It should also track the actual money that you spend.

By comparing the estimated amount you plan to spend to the actual amount you spend, you can guide future plans. You can create better estimates of costs, as well as know how much you must cut future budgets due to overspending in the past.

How to Prepare a Marketing Budget

Knowing what to include in your marketing budget is only half the process. You also have to know what budget to set for each section and line item.

Unfortunately, there is no exact formula for determining how much your business should spend on marketing. Setting your marketing budget will depend on many factors. But there are some formulas and considerations you can use to find the best budget for your business.

Consider your revenue. The amount of money your business brings in helps you start to shape your annual marketing budget. Calculate your business’ gross revenue.

Your gross revenue is the money your brand receives before deducting any expenses. You can use this number to help you determine a responsible marketing budget, and you can also create estimated revenue for upcoming years based on what you know about previous years.

Consider the age of your business. If you have a new business that doesn’t have any customers, you will need to spend more on marketing than if you had an established company with a loyal client base. It is often recommended that:

  • New companies (1-5 years in business) spend about 12-20% of gross revenue on marketing.
  • Established companies (5+ years in business) spend about 6-12% of gross revenue on marketing.

Consider your fixed marketing expenses. To fill in a marketing budget template, you can’t just think about the money you want to spend. You need to think about the money you must spend.

These line items include the expenses you need to run your marketing department. It may include recurring costs such as website maintenance fees, hosting costs, tool subscriptions, and contractor retainers. As you decide what to spend, start with these fixed costs to get an idea of what is left for other items.

Consider your customer acquisition cost. A customer acquisition cost (CAC) is the amount of money it takes for your business to get a new customer. To find a CAC, divide your annual marketing costs by the numbers of new customers in that time period.

Knowing your CAC helps you decide how much you need to spend on marketing, as it offers insight into the how much you need to spend to bring in a certain number of customers. For example, if your CAC is $100 and your brand wants 10 new customers in the next month, you could estimate that you need to spend about $1,000 ($100 x 10 customers).

Consider your customer lifetime value. Customer lifetime value (CLV) is the amount of money your brand brings in from one customer over their lifetime of doing business with you. This number is especially important for new businesses that are in the customer acquisition phase. Knowing how much value a customer adds to your business helps you see how much you can spend to bring in that customer and still profit.

For example, if your average CLV is $3,000, and your business makes $2,000 in gross profit from that $3,000, it may be worth it to spend $1,000 on marketing to acquire that customer.

While none of these numbers will give you the exact amount you should spend on your marketing budget, the insights from each of these elements will help you find the best number for your unique business.

Download Your Complete Marketing Budget Template

Now that you know what goes into creating an annual marketing budget, how to break down your line items to include each of your expenses, and how to determine the right amount to spend on your efforts, get started now.

Download our free marketing budget template Excel sheet.

This marketing budget template includes a sheet for your overall marketing budget along with other individual sheets for tracking more detailed marketing categories and departments.

For even more help with creating your marketing plans, sign up for a free trial of Alexa’s Advanced Plan. This suite of tools helps you gain insights about your industry, learn about your customers, and research your competitors so that you can get a better idea of how to create more powerful marketing plans.

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14 Types of Backlinks: the Good, the Bad, and the Best https://blog.alexa.com/types-of-backlinks/ https://blog.alexa.com/types-of-backlinks/#respond Thu, 25 Oct 2018 21:16:30 +0000 https://blog.alexa.com/?p=6334 Acquiring backlinks is an essential part of an effective SEO plan. Links tell search engines that a site is recognized, trusted, and, therefore, worthy of a top spot on search engine results pages (SERPs). But it’s not just the number of backlinks that appeals to search engines; it’s also the types of backlinks. Depending on [...]

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8 minute read

Acquiring backlinks is an essential part of an effective SEO plan. Links tell search engines that a site is recognized, trusted, and, therefore, worthy of a top spot on search engine results pages (SERPs). But it’s not just the number of backlinks that appeals to search engines; it’s also the types of backlinks.

Depending on the link type, backlinks have varying levels of influence on search engine rankings and on the results you can see from acquiring them. The rest of this post will look at the different types of backlinks, explain their value, and offer tips for how you can acquire the most valuable and effective backlinks.

3 Factors That Impact Link Value

Before we review a full list of backlink types, it’s important to understand what makes a link valuable. As mentioned above, backlinks are not all created equal. There are a variety of factors that can make backlinks more valuable than others, and there are also some that make a link very bad for SEO.

The 3 main factors that impact link value include the following:

1. The Authority of the Linking Site

The most valuable types of backlinks come from quality websites. Links from sites that are recognized as top authoritative resources will send more positive signals to search engines than links from low-quality, lesser-known sites.


The most valuable types of backlinks come from quality websites.
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To determine the authority of a site (and the value of a link), look at the linking site’s Alexa Rank. The better (i.e., lower) the Alexa Rank of the linking site, the better the link is for SEO. Sites with a low Alexa Rank are more authoritative than sites with a high Alexa Rank. You can check a site’s Alexa Rank using Alexa’s Site Overview tool.

authoritative types of backlinks

2. Do Follow vs. No Follow Status

When a publisher adds a link to their website, they can use HTML code to set the link as either “do follow” or “no follow.”

  • Do follow links tell search engines to notice and give SEO value to the links.
  • No follow links tell search engines to ignore the links and give them less SEO value.

Because do follow links send better signals to search engines, they are more valuable than no follow links.  You want links to your site to be coded as do follow. However, a no follow backlink can still drive traffic to your website.


Because do follow links send better signals to search engines, they are more valuable than no follow links.
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To know if a link is a do follow or no follow, you can use the NoFollow Simple Chrome extension to easily check the link’s code.

do follow backlinks extension

Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google LLC, used with permission.

3. On-Site Link Location

Websites are set up in sections, and how valuable a link is may be impacted by the section in which it appears.

The most valuable links are placed within the main body content of the site. Links may not receive the same value from search engines when they appear in the header, footer, or sidebar of the page. This is an important factor to keep in mind as you seek to build high-quality backlinks. Look to build links that will be included in the main body content of a site.

The Best Types of Backlinks

Now that you know what makes backlinks valuable, let’s look at a list of the best backlinks for SEO. As you learn how to create backlinks, these are the strategies that will provide the best long-term SEO results.

Editorial Backlinks

The best types of links in SEO come from editorial mentions. An editorial mention is when another website refers and links to your website in a piece of quality content. An editorial backlink may be included as:

  • Citing someone from your company or something from your content as a source of information
  • Referring to your website as a resource for additional information
  • Citing your website as the creator of an infographic
  • Including your website or content in a link roundup
  • Interviewing someone associated with your website

The best types of links in SEO come from editorial mentions.
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How to Get Editorial Backlinks:

  • Develop a strong content marketing
  • Create high-quality, evergreen content that serves as a go-to resource.
  • Create shareable content that other sites will want to talk about.
  • Publish content that shows your website and brand as a thought leader in your industry so that other sites will want to cite, source, and interview you.

Use Alexa’s Competitor Keyword Matrix to find popular keywords and topics you haven’t written about yet. Consider keyword popularity to find trending topics you can write about on your website.

find keywords for link worthy content

Guest Blogging Backlinks

Guest blogging is another way to acquire valuable backlinks. When you submit a guest post to a website, you’re often allowed to include an editorial backlink within your content. These types of backlinks are a reliable way to build trust and authority through other influential publications.

How to Get Guest Blogging Backlinks: Build a list of valuable guest blogging sites and master guest blogging outreach.

Business Profile Backlinks

In most cases, when you create an online profile for a business, you can include a link back to your website. These links on business listings, social media networks, and industry-specific directories show search engines that a website is established and high quality.

How to Get Business Profile Backlinks: Create profiles on well-known directories or review sites (such as Yellow Pages, Yelp, Foursquare, Capterra, etc.) in your industry. Or consider using a service like Synup or Yext that creates and manages profiles for you.

Webinar Links

Creating a valuable resource on your site often encourages other sites to link back to it. A high-value piece of content that often leads to links is a webinar recording. Other sites frequently link to or even embed other brand’s webinars on their site, leading to both links and brand mentions.

How to Get Webinar Backlinks: Repurpose your webinars by posting them as recordings on your website so people can visit and link to them. Use blog promotion to attract attention to the webinar recording, and find guest blogging sites that may be interested in using the webinar as resource on their site.

Free Tool Links

Another way to get sites to link back to something valuable on your site is by offering a free tool. A free tool could be a basic tool (like an auto loan calculator) or a scaled down version of a paid tool (like Alexa’s Site Overview and Audience Overlap tools). If the tools are valuable enough, others will link to them in their content. Plus, on free versions of paid tools, you can add call-to-actions to sign up for the full product/service which drives acquisition in addition to awareness.

find similar sites free tool backlink

How to Get Free Tool Backlinks: Create a simple tool or free version of your paid tool. Use Alexa’s Audience Overlap tool to find sites that have a similar audience who would be interested in using your tool, and use guest blogging outreach to connect with the sites and see if they would like to feature your free tool.

Good Types of Backlinks

There are other types of backlinks that don’t provide as much value as those listed above, but can still support your overall link profile and help boost your SEO.

Acknowledgment Backlinks

An acknowledgment backlink is when a website mentions and links to a website in reference to a relationship or sponsorship. These links typically don’t have much content related to the brand or what they do, and instead, are simple mentions that:

  • Indicate that the brand made a donation
  • Show that someone from the brand is speaking at or sponsoring an event
  • Include a testimonial for the linking website’s brand

How to Get Acknowledgment Backlinks: Use Alexa’s Competitor Backlink Checker to find backlinks your competitors get traffic from. Identify sites where they acquired acknowledgment backlinks, and look for places in those sites’ content where you can do the same.

find competitor backlinks

Guest Post Bio Backlinks

In some cases, guest blogging sites don’t allow or won’t include a link back to the author’s site within the main body of content. Instead, they allow the author to include a link in the author bio. While not as valuable as a link in the body of the post, bio backlinks can still add value to a website’s link portfolio.

How to Get Guest Bio Backlinks: Use the same guest posting strategies mentioned above and also perform a backlink analysis on your competitors to see where they have acquired guest post links.

Badge Backlinks

A way to build backlinks by providing value to other sites is through branded badges. A branded badge is an award that a brand creates and gives out to other sites as a status symbol. For example, you could create a list of the top sites or best brands that are published on your site, and then give badges to each brand on the list so that they can show the status on their site. You include a link back to the article on the badge to create the link.

badge types of backlinks

Credit: Scary Mommy

How to Get Badge Backlinks: Look for a group of sites that you can qualify together and create a badge to identify them. To find similar sites, use Alexa’s Audience Overlap tool to identify groups of sites that share themes and audiences.

find similar sites using Audience Overlap

Newsworthy Press Release Backlinks

A press release can serve double duty for marketing efforts. It can alert media outlets about your news and also help your website gain backlinks. But it can only build links effectively if executed properly. Only write and distribute press releases when a brand has something newsworthy or interesting to share. This strategy can gain links on the actual press release post as well as on the stories that media outlets write about it.

How to Get Press Release Backlinks: When your brand has news, write a press release and use a service like PRWeb or Newswire to distribute it to media outlets.

Comment Backlinks

When you comment on a blog post, you are usually allowed to include a link back to your website. This is often abused by spammers and can become a negative link building tool. But if you post genuine comments on high-quality blog posts, there can be some value in sharing links, as it can drive traffic to your site and increase the visibility of your brand.

How to Get Comment Backlinks: Don’t overdo it with this strategy. Only focus on commenting on relevant, high-quality blogs or forums related to your industry. To find sites relevant to your industry and audience, use Alexa’s Audience Overlap tool to find similar sites your audience uses.

find relevant sites for conversation

Bad Types of Backlinks

Because high quality backlinks are such an important part of SEO, it’s easy to believe that every link, no matter how valuable, is beneficial. But not all links are valuable. Some links have little to no value, while others can actually negatively impact SEO. As you engage in link building, avoid creating these types of backlinks.

Paid Links

While it can seem like an easy way to acquire links, you should not pay other publishers and websites to link to your site. Google explicitly says that buying or selling links “can negatively impact a site’s ranking in search results.”

Non-Newsworthy Press Releases

As mentioned above, interesting and newsworthy press releases can help a brand gain attention and links. But it can also appear spammy if a brand repeatedly spreads press releases that aren’t newsworthy and are created for the sole intention of gaining links.

General Business and Article Directory Links

Just as you don’t want to overdo it with press releases, you also don’t want to overreach with directory listings. Stick to the most trustworthy, authoritative, and industry-relevant directories and don’t create profiles on spammy directories just for the purpose of generating links.

Forum Links

Joining dozens of forums for the purpose of posting links back to your site is also bad. Only join high-quality forums where authentic discussions are the primary purpose, not spamming a thread with posts about your content and brand.

Build a Better Backlink Strategy

Links are an essential part of any good SEO strategy. But remember, it’s not just about the quantity of links; it’s also about the quality of the links.

There are different types of backlinks that come with varying levels of value and importance. Create your link building plans around acquiring top-tier links that will be the most beneficial to your SEO.

To find the best backlinks for SEO, sign up for a free trial of Alexa’s Advanced Plan. You’ll get access to all of the audience, industry, and keyword research tools mentioned in this post that can help you build an effective link building plan.

improve seo performance tour

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Pay-Per-Click Marketing: Your Guide to Getting Started With Paid Search https://blog.alexa.com/pay-per-click-marketing/ https://blog.alexa.com/pay-per-click-marketing/#respond Mon, 15 Oct 2018 16:11:47 +0000 https://blog.alexa.com/?p=6300 Pay-per-click marketing can be a powerful tool in your promotional arsenal. If your goals are to grow your online visibility, drive traffic, generate leads, and increase sales, pay-per-click (PPC) can help you accomplish all of those things. But before you can reap these benefits, you need to have a full understanding of how pay-per-click marketing [...]

The post Pay-Per-Click Marketing: Your Guide to Getting Started With Paid Search appeared first on Alexa Blog.

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10 minute read

Pay-per-click marketing can be a powerful tool in your promotional arsenal. If your goals are to grow your online visibility, drive traffic, generate leads, and increase sales, pay-per-click (PPC) can help you accomplish all of those things.

But before you can reap these benefits, you need to have a full understanding of how pay-per-click marketing works and how to best optimize your ads to fully utilize your budget and attract your ideal audience.

The rest of this post will help you grow your knowledge about pay-per-click marketing so you can set up high-performing PPC campaigns. This post will look at:

Download the complete pay-per-click marketing guide now.

What is Pay-Per-Click Advertising?

Pay-per-click advertising, also known as PPC or search engine marketing (SEM), is a tactic where a brand places an ad online and pays each time a user clicks on it. There is no cost to place the ad. The cost is only incurred when users engage with the ad.

Pay-per-click marketing can be broken down into two categories:

  • Search advertising: Ads that appear as search results on search engine results pages (SERPs)
  • Display advertising: Ads that appear as graphics, videos, or paid posts typically found on social media feeds and other third-party websites

This post will mostly talk about search advertising PPC campaigns.

The Most Popular PPC Platforms

While there are multiple platforms for pay-per-click marketing, most marketers use Google Ads for their PPC search ad campaigns.

Google Ads, formerly Google AdWords, is the most popular PPC search advertising provider.

Because most people use Google for search, it’s the ideal place for placing paid search ads. These ad results show up on SERPs and include an “Ad” designation that shows they are paid, not organic, listings.


Because most people use Google for search, it’s the ideal place to set up paid search ads.
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pay-per-click marketing search results

Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google LLC, used with permission.

Other popular pay-per-click marketing providers include other search engines and also social media sites such as:

  • Bing Ads
  • Facebook Ads
  • Twitter Ads
  • Promoted Pinterest Pins
  • LinkedIn Ads
  • Quora Ads

Many of the social networks use a form of display PPC. This is an example of how a display PPC ad would appear on Facebook:

But again, this guide is about PPC search ads and will primarily focus on ads that appear as search results on SERPs.

How Does Pay-Per-Click Work?

As its name implies, PPC is an advertising method where a brand sets up an ad and pays each time a user clicks on that ad. A simple explanation of this process looks like this:

  1. Through keyword discovery, a brand identifies relevant, popular terms that its audience regularly searches for.
  2. A brand creates a search result ad that will be visible to users when they search for the target keywords.
  3. A user searches for one of the keywords, sees the ad on a SERP, and clicks on it.
  4. The brand is charged for the user clicking on the ad.

Here’s a more specific pay-per-click marketing example:

  1. Dropbox sees that its target audience regularly searches for “cloud storage.”
  2. The company creates a PPC search ad to show when users search for “cloud storage.” Dropbox pays nothing to set up the ad campaign through Google Ads.
  3. A user searches for “cloud storage,” sees the Dropbox paid search result, and clicks on it.
  4. Dropbox is charged.
dropbox pay-per-click marketing example

Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google LLC, used with permission.

This breakdown explains how the ad process works. Now, let’s dive deeper into how to set up pay-per-click marketing campaigns on Google Ads.

Free Download: Your Guide to Getting Started with Pay-Per-Click Marketing

If your goal for PPC is to show paid search results to users, Google Ads is your best bet. It is the most popular search engine with the most users.

Understanding Your Google Ads Account

Before we look at how to set up your pay-per-click marketing campaign, familiarize yourself with some Google Ads terminology and tools.

Campaigns are the top-level organizational structure of your account within Google Ads. They are usually organized to reflect a specific theme related to your business. You can have one or more campaigns within your Google account. Guidelines you set within a campaign include budget, language, location, distribution for the Google Network, and more. Within a campaign, you can have one or more ad group.

A shoe store may have campaigns for men’s shoes, women’s shoes, and children’s shoes.

Ad groups are the next level of organization within your plan. You can have more than one ad group within a campaign. At this point, you can get more specific about a theme of your business. Each ad group contains one or more ads.

Within its women’s shoes campaigns, the shoe store may have ad groups for heels, flats, and sandals.

Keywords are the terms targeted within your campaign. You select the terms you think your audience will search for. When users search for those terms, they may see your search ad on SERPs.

The women’s shoes, heels campaign may include keywords such as: blue high heels, platform heels, and strappy heels.

Ads are made up of the actual content and copy that users see on SERPs when they search for your target keywords. You have multiple options for how these ads look and what information they contain. Text ads always include two headline sections and a description line. They can be expanded to include sitelink, callout, phone, and location extensions and more. (You can also create rich product listings and image ads.)

pay-per-click marketing ad

Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google LLC, used with permission.

Defining Google Ads Campaign Settings

Now that you know the basic structure of a Google Ads account, let’s look closer at the settings you can control within each of your pay-per-click marketing campaigns.

Campaign types are the options you have for where you want your ads to appear. There are multiple campaign types, including display network, shopping campaign, and video campaign. The campaign type that you would use for PPC lead generation is called a search network campaign. Ads created in a search network campaign appear as text ads in SERPs.

Device targeting gives you options for which types of devices will be able to see your ads. You have options to target desktops, tablets, mobile devices, or a custom combination of the three. Depending on your ad types, you may want to focus on one device type. In general, search ads work well on every device.

Location targeting gives you options to target specific geographic areas. You can select this by multiple options, such as city name, zip code, or mile radius. This setting may be used by local businesses that only want to connect with people who live near their business.

Budget is the amount you want to spend on your campaign. You use this to specify how much, on average, you’d like to spend each day. Later in this post, we’ll look closer at how to choose a budget and set bids for your ads.

Setting Up PPC Ads on Google

Now that you have the language and knowledge to navigate your Google Ads account, let’s look at the best ways to set up and optimize your campaigns.

Organize Your Account

When you’re ready to launch a pay-per-click marketing strategy, start by organizing your business into categories. As mentioned earlier, your Google account has a structure of campaigns and sub-groups of ad groups within those campaigns.

Create a structure for how you want to organize that information. For example, the shoe store could have the following structure.

  • Campaign #1: Men’s Shoes
    • Ad Group #1: Sneakers
    • Ad Group #2: Dress Shoes
    • Ad Group #3: Sandals
  • Campaign #2: Women’s Shoes
    • Ad Group #1: Heels
    • Ad Group #2: Flats
    • Ad Group #3: Sandals

It will be easier to set up your account once you have this structure. Planning out your ad campaigns will also help you create more relevant and targeted ads with your Google ad groups.

Perform PPC Keyword Research

Once you have your campaign structure, look for the keywords to use in your ad group. Perform keyword research to identify the top keywords in your industry.

To find the best keywords for your PPC campaign, use Alexa’s Keyword Difficulty Tool. Enter a topic related to your business, brand, or offerings and discover terms to use for your campaign. Look for terms that have a high keyword popularity score, which indicates that users frequently search for these terms.

pay-per-click keyword research

In your keyword research, it helps to know which search terms are popular among users. It also helps to know which search terms are targeted by your competitors.

Knowing which PPC terms your competitors are targeting can help you see which search phrases are performing well and which terms may be too expensive to compete with. You may also find relevant keywords you hadn’t thought of, but your competitors are already getting traffic for.

To get a look at how your competitors are using pay-per-click marketing, use Alexa’s Competitor Keyword Matrix. Enter up to 10 of your competitors to get a look at which terms they are targeting within their own paid campaigns.

pay-per-click competitor keyword research

Once you determine the keywords you want to target, you can then base the rest of your campaign strategy on targeting those terms.

Set Your Pay-Per-Click Marketing Budget

The pay-per-click marketing cost in Google Ads includes two methods for setting your budget: daily budget and bidding.

  • Budget is the total amount you’re willing to spend on a campaign per day.
  • Bid is the total amount you’re willing to spend for a specific keyword (how much you will pay when a user clicks on an ad that showed when they searched for the target keyword).

When you’re starting out, you may want to spread your budget across all of your campaigns. As you start to see results from your campaigns, you can decide to focus your budget on higher-performing keywords and campaigns.

For bids, you should select a budget based on keyword competition. Choose a bid that will give your ad a desirable ranking while still staying within your budget.

Manage and Optimize Your PPC Campaigns

Once you set up a pay-per-click marketing campaign, your work is not over.  To get the most out of your campaign, you should continue to monitor and optimize your account in a few ways.


Get the most out of your PPC campaigns by consistently monitoring and optimizing your ads.
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Your goal is to improve your ads so Google gives them priority and you can get the most out of your budget. To accomplish that, you need to consider Quality Score and Keyword Relevance.

  • Quality Score: Google considers factors related to your ads (such as ad content, keywords, and landing pages) to give a Quality Score to your ads. Higher Quality Scores can lead to better ad placement and lower cost-per-clicks.
  • Keyword Relevance: Your keywords should be closely related to the content on the landing page it is driving traffic to. This factor will increase your Quality Score.

Here are some tips for managing and optimizing your PPC campaigns so you can improve your Quality Score, get better ad placements, and pay less per click.

  • Monitor conversion rates. Keep an eye on your campaigns and look for trends that show which settings, keywords, and ads are converting and which are not. Adjust accordingly to get the best results out of your ad spend.
  • Add keywords. Continue to identify and add search terms and phrases to your campaigns that are relevant to your business and regularly used by your target audience. This process helps you find more keywords you may have missed while setting up your campaign.
  • Remove negative keywords. Identify terms in your campaigns that aren’t converting and remove them. This process can improve your Quality Score and help you avoid wasting money.
  • Remove costly keywords. If you’re paying a steep price for specific keywords but not seeing very much return on your investment, remove or turn off those terms.
  • Split up ad groups. Break ad groups into smaller, more relevant groups. By having more targeted ad text and landing pages, you can improve click-through rates and your Quality Score.
  • Improve landing pages. To create a landing page that converts, make sure you continually optimize it using conversion rate optimization best practices. The more your pages remain relevant and match search intent, the more likely they are to convert.

Should You Use Pay-Per-Click Marketing?

Just because you know how to set up a pay-per-click marketing campaign doesn’t mean you should jump into Google Ads right away.

Like all good marketing strategies, you should start by looking at your goals and then choosing the best tactics that will lead to your ideal end results. In this case, you need to review your marketing objectives and decide if paid SEM or organic SEO will help you reach your goals.

We recently put together a post and infographic on understanding the difference between SEM vs. SEO. You can check out the whole post or consider these main factors to help you decide which is right for your brand.

How much competition is there for your target keywords?

  • Consider PPC if there is a lot of competition for your target keywords.
  • Consider SEO if there are a lot of organic content gaps to fill in.

How well do you know your market segment?

  • Consider PPC if you don’t know it well yet and want to test your idea, product, or service.
  • Consider SEO if you already know it has long-term value and demand.

How long are your customers’ average buying cycles?

  • Consider PPC if your customers typically know what they want, search for it, and immediately buy it.
  • Consider SEO if your customers research for days, weeks, or months before buying.

What’s the average cost-per-click in your industry?

  • Consider PPC if your cost-per-click is low and within your budget.
  • Consider SEO if the cost-per-click in your industry is very high.

How old are your business and website?

  • Consider PPC if your business is new and you have little to no online presence.
  • Consider SEO if your business and website are established and already have some online authority.

What’s the current state of your website’s SEO?

  • Consider PPC if your website needs a lot of work to improve its current organic SEO factors.
  • Consider SEO if your website is already fairly optimized and currently performing well in organic search.

These factors will help you determine if pay-per-click marketing or organic SEO will help you reach your goals faster and with better results.

Build a Powerful Pay-Per-Click Marketing Campaign

Pay-per-click marketing is an on-demand way to grow your digital visibility, increase website traffic, collect leads, and drive sales. But to get the best results from PPC, you need to take a strategic approach to setting up your campaigns.

You need to target the right keywords and continually update your strategy to improve your campaigns and get the most out of your budget.

With the information in this post and pay-per-click marketing guide, you’re now better equipped to set up strategic PPC campaigns.

To get even more data and information to drive your strategy, sign up for a free trial of Alexa’s Advanced plan. Our tools can help you research your industry and keywords so you can have the information you need to set up high-performing pay-per-click marketing campaigns.

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SEM vs. SEO: What’s the Difference and Which is Right for My Brand? https://blog.alexa.com/sem-vs-seo/ https://blog.alexa.com/sem-vs-seo/#respond Thu, 11 Oct 2018 15:55:42 +0000 https://blog.alexa.com/?p=6279 Search optimization is an essential marketing strategy for brands trying to attract attention, drive website traffic, and grow their business. But search optimization can be a difficult strategy to manage if you don’t know how to compare SEM vs. SEO. The tactics may sound the same, but they are two very different approaches to search [...]

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10 minute read

Search optimization is an essential marketing strategy for brands trying to attract attention, drive website traffic, and grow their business. But search optimization can be a difficult strategy to manage if you don’t know how to compare SEM vs. SEO.

The tactics may sound the same, but they are two very different approaches to search optimization. If you use the terms SEM and SEO interchangeably and don’t know the differences between the two, you won’t be able to communicate a clear and effective strategy for improving your visibility in search.

This post will give you a clear understanding of the definition and value of each. It will help you answer the following questions:

You’ll also discover SEO and SEM basics and strategies that will help you improve your visibility and performance in search. Take a look at our SEO vs. SEM infographic to help you visualize the differences between the two.

What is Search Marketing?

Before you can create a strategic search optimization strategy, you need to understand the terminology for this type of marketing. So let’s start at the top.

Search marketing relates to any tactic that helps a brand get attention by appearing on search engine results pages (SERPs) . It includes efforts to get higher rankings and increase search visibility so you can drive more traffic to a website or specific webpages.

There are two major categories within search marketing:

  • SEM, which uses PAID strategies to appear in search
  • SEO, which uses ORGANIC strategies to appear in search

The main difference between SEM vs. SEO is that SEM is a paid strategy and SEO is an organic strategy.

Like most things in the search industry, the definitions related to search marketing have evolved. Some marketers may consider SEM to be an umbrella term that includes both paid and organic strategies. But to make your marketing plan clear, we recommend breaking the terms into these distinct categories.

difference between SEM vs. SEO

Because these terms can be interchangeable and mean different things to different marketers, always clarify the terminology before working with search partners. Discuss the definitions with your marketing partners to ensure that you are approaching the strategy with the same understanding.

What is SEM?

SEM, or search engine marketing, is often considered the part of search marketing that uses PAID tactics to gain visibility in SERPs. A paid SEM strategy includes both the activities involved with setting up and optimizing ads as well as setting a budget that pays for the placement of ads.

This strategy is often referred to as paid search or pay-per-click (PPC) marketing.

Google Ads (formerly Google Adwords) is the search provider most commonly used for this strategy. With this tactic, brands conduct keyword research and create campaigns that target the best keywords for their industry, products, or services. When users search for those keywords, they see the custom ads at the top or bottom of SERPs. The brand is charged each time a user clicks on the ad.

For more SEM tips and basic strategies, check out our post on PPC lead generation.

what is SEM

What is SEO?

SEO, or search engine optimization, is the part of search marketing that uses ORGANIC tactics to gain visibility in SERPs. With SEO, brands don’t pay for placement on SERPs. Instead, they use a variety of tactics that prompt search engines to show their content near the top of SERPs because the result is valuable and authoritative.

SEO includes hundreds of tactics that can help a brand increase their search rankings. These white hat SEO techniques are often grouped into three categories.

  • On-page SEO optimizes each individual page of a website to target a specific keyword and appeal to search engines. These strategies include: keyword research, content creation, and keyword optimization. On-page optimization in SEO helps search engines understand a page of content and, therefore, give it higher ranks.
  • Technical SEO optimizes the non-content elements of a website and the website as a whole to improve its backend structure and foundation. These strategies relate to: site speed, mobile friendliness, indexing, crawlability, site architecture, structured data, and security. Technical SEO improves both user and search crawler experience, which leads to higher search rankings.
  • Off-page SEO builds a website’s reputation and authority by connecting it to other high-quality websites. Off-page SEO techniques include: link building (acquiring high-quality backlinks) from other websites and managing local listings and directory profiles. When many websites link to a brand’s website, it shows search engines that the brand’s website is trustworthy, reliable, and reputable, which increases its search rankings.

A strong SEO plan doesn’t focus on just one of these three types of SEO  but instead combines all three strategies to produce the best results.

what is SEO

SEM vs. SEO: What’s the Difference?

SEM and SEO are unique elements of search marketing. But when you compare SEM vs. SEO, you’ll find that they have both similarities that overlap and differences that separate them.

SEM vs. SEO: The Similarities

SEM vs. SEO similarities

Both help a brand appear in search results. One of the SEO and SEM basics is that they both aim to help a brand appear in prominent positions on SERPs. The goal of each tactic is to help a brand show up in search results when users search for specific terms related to the brand’s industry, business, or offerings.

Both are designed to drive more traffic to a website. The goal of both is to gain visibility on SERPs, but more importantly, to drive traffic to a website. Each strategy employs tactics to increase click-through-rates (CTR) and get more users to click on the search results.

Both require knowing your audience. To succeed at both strategies, you must have a good understanding of your audience and how they act. By using buyer personas and psychographic segmentation, you can get to know your audience, discover what their needs are, and what they are searching for. Then you can create valuable content that shows up when they go looking for solutions related to your brand.

Both use keyword research to uncover popular search terms. The first step for both SEM and SEO is performing keyword research to identify the best keywords to target. The research includes looking at keyword popularity to determine the top keywords or buying keywords that your ideal audience searches for. It also includes looking at keyword competition to see what other brands are targeting the same keywords and determining what you will need to do to compete with those other companies.

To conduct keyword research, start with Alexa’s Keyword Difficulty Tool. Enter a search term related to your industry, business, products, or services and view a list of related search terms along with scores on their popularity and competition.

SEM vs. SEO keyword research

Both target specific keywords. Both strategies focus on targeting specific keywords that are identified during keyword research. At the core of each tactic are keywords.

Both require testing and continual optimization. When comparing SEM vs. SEO, you should know that neither is a strategy that you can set and forget. Both require continual testing, monitoring, and optimization to increase performance.

SEM vs. SEO: The Differences

SEM vs. SEO differences

SEM search placements include an “Ad” designation. SEO does not. Search results that appear as a result of SEM or SEO look different on SERPs. Paid ads that receive placement through SEM tactics are often identified as an ad (e.g., by an icon appearing next to the placement), whereas the search results that appear as a result of organic SEO are not marked in such manner.

SEM vs. SEO search results

Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google LLC, used with permission.

SEM search results have ad extensions. SEO search results have featured snippets. When comparing SEM vs. SEO, you’ll also find differences in the appearance of the search results. SEM search results may include ad extensions, which can add on additional links, phone numbers, and callouts. On the other hand, SEO results may appear with featured snippets in search.

SEM ad extensions

Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google LLC, used with permission.

You pay each time a user clicks on an SEM result. You pay nothing when a user clicks on an SEO result. SEM results are paid placements, and your brand is charged each time a user clicks on the result. Therefore, you must have a budget for continually showing SEM ads and using this form of PPC lead generation. On the flip side, you are never charged when a user clicks on an organic search result.

SEM results show to a select target audience. SEO results do not. While successful SEO and SEM strategies are driven by a plan to connect with a select audience, you can only specify that target audience through SEM. Through SEM, you can (depending on the publisher) select what audiences you want to see the search results by assigning filters based on age, location, income, habits, and more. Through SEO, you cannot specifically choose who will see your search results.

The impact of SEM is immediate. SEO takes time. Through paid SEM ads, you can start to put your results in front of audiences with just a few clicks. As soon as you launch a campaign, your ads start showing in SERPs. At any time, you can turn ads on to increase visibility or turn them off to stop showing. Conversely, SEO is something that you acquire over time and typically over a long time. It can take months of implementing an SEO strategy before a brand begins to rank on search engines.

SEM is better for testing than SEO. Because you can immediately turn SEM paid ads off and on, it’s a great strategy for testing. You can quickly revise your ad copy, target new audiences, and change landing page content to test your new tactics. This flexibility allows you to see differences in your strategies immediately. You cannot accomplish this through SEO, as it would take too much time to make changes and monitor differences in results.


Because you can immediately turn paid ads off and on, SEM is a great strategy for testing.
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Learn more: Conversion Rate Optimization Best Practices: 5 Mistakes Beginners Make

SEO adds value over time. SEM does not. SEM is only active as long as you pay for your results to show. As soon as you turn off your ads, your SEM strategy is over. SEO is the opposite. SEO strategy grows and compounds over time and leaves lasting results.

SEO has a higher click-through rate (CTR) than SEM … if you can get to the top. The first few organic search results typically have the highest CTRs. So if you can get to the top, you can likely outperform SEM ads. But if you appear on the second page of results or lower, you can probably get more clicks through SEM.

SEM vs. SEO: Which is Better?

Now that you have compared SEM vs. SEO, it will be easier to decide which tactic is right for your marketing strategies. To decide which is right for your brand, use what you know and consider the following.

SEM vs. SEO which is better

Consider your competition. Look at what your competitors are doing and how they are performing in their search marketing before you decide how you can best compete with them. Research what search terms they rank organically for. Consider if you can execute a plan to top their SERP placements. Also, look at what paid terms they are using to drive traffic to their own sites. As you perform this research, look for gaps that you can fill and areas where you will be unable to compete in both paid and organic search.

This competitive analysis template can help you get a complete look at how you stack up to the competition in search and uncover opportunities for growth.

To get a good look at the keyword strategy of your competitors, use Alexa’s Competitive Keyword Matrix. Enter up to 10 of your competitors to review both the top organic and paid search terms that are driving the most traffic to their sites.

alexa competitor keyword analysis

Consider how well you know your industry. If you have been in business for a while and already know what your customers want and how to best reach them, you may want to start to build a long-term SEO strategy that will provide value over time. If you aren’t sure how customers and competitors will respond to your offerings or content, you may want to consider an SEM campaign that allows you to test your ideas, products, and services. Use these sites for market research to better understand your target audience and your position in the industry.

Consider the length of your typical customer buying cycle. If your products and services have a short customer buying cycle, meaning your customers know what they want, search for it, and buy it, you may benefit from SEM ads that put your product right where customers will see it. Longer buying cycles, where customers research and compare for weeks or months, may not perform as well with SEM, as there isn’t an immediate buy after seeing one ad.

Consider the average cost-per-click in your industry. Before deciding that SEM is right for your business, research and consider how much you’ll need to spend to show in paid search results. Keywords have varying cost-per-clicks based on competition. If your cost-per-click is low, it might be the right strategy for you. On the flipside, a very high cost-per-click might make you decide you’re better off focusing on SEO.

Consider the age of your business. If you just opened your business and launched your website, it’s going to take time to develop your SEO and begin to appear organically in the search. While that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t put together an SEO strategy, it does mean that you could benefit from an SEM strategy until you build your SEO. SEM is an effective way to drive traffic while building organic SEO.


SEM is an effective way to drive traffic while building organic SEO.
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Consider the current status of your website. When you create a marketing strategy, look for the “low-hanging fruit”, or the opportunities that will make the biggest impact with the least amount of work. So before you launch a search marketing campaign, research your website to see where you may have the potential to grow an organic SEO strategy that is already working before putting money into an SEM campaign.

To get a full review of your website’s SEO, use Alexa’s SEO Audit tool. Enter your site to get a detailed report on your site’s status as it relates to on-page, off-page, and technical SEO elements.

Alexa SEO Audit Tool

You can also download this free SEO audit report to help you map out your current SEO performance and create a roadmap for long term success.

A Complete Look at SEM vs. SEO

SEM vs. SEO infographic

Improve Both of Your SEO and SEM Strategies

When comparing SEM vs. SEO, there is no quick formula or simple answer. There are a lot of factors to consider. Some businesses may choose to focus on SEO. Others may choose to focus on SEM. And sometimes the right approach is to implement a combination of SEO and SEM strategies. It all depends on your unique business and goals.

But now that you know the similarities and differences between SEM and SEO, you’ll be better equipped to decide how each can help your brand reach its goals.

To get even more insight and data to help you make those decisions, sign up for a free trial of Alexa’s Advanced Plan. You’ll get access to tools that help you research competitor search and link building strategies, find keyword opportunities, review your site’s SEO, and learn about your target audience. These insights, paired with what you know about SEM and SEO, will help you uncover the best search marketing strategy for your unique brand and goals.

improve seo performance tour

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The Right Way to Launch a Blog Syndication Strategy https://blog.alexa.com/blog-syndication/ https://blog.alexa.com/blog-syndication/#respond Thu, 04 Oct 2018 17:05:18 +0000 https://blog.alexa.com/?p=6256 You put a lot of time, resources, and energy into creating great blog content for your site. Why wouldn’t you want to get the most out of that content that you can? Thankfully, there is a way to get even more results from your work and stretch your content so that it attracts more readers, [...]

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7 minute read

You put a lot of time, resources, and energy into creating great blog content for your site. Why wouldn’t you want to get the most out of that content that you can? Thankfully, there is a way to get even more results from your work and stretch your content so that it attracts more readers, traffic, and SEO value. It’s through blog syndication.


Blog syndication helps you get more out of your content. It attracts new readers, drives more traffic, and boosts SEO value.
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What is Content Syndication?

Blog syndication is the process of publishing a piece of content on your site and then republishing the same content on one or more other websites that are relevant to your audience.

For example, you could publish a blog post on your site, and then a week or two later, another website could publish the same post on their site. The second post would be the same as the original (while sometimes featuring a different headline), attributed to you, and include a link back to your site.

Benefits of a content syndication strategy:

  • It builds your brand authority as you can appear in more industry publications.
  • It gets your top of funnel content in front of new audiences.
  • It repurposes your content so that you get more out of the work you’ve already done.
  • It provides long-term SEO results by building links back to your website (when done correctly).
  • It drives traffic back to your site as audiences click to view the source or original article.

To get these benefits, you need to set up a content syndication process that follows best practices for linking, targeting the right sites, and getting the most out of your repurposed content. If you don’t follow these best practices, blog syndication could bring more problems than benefits to your content strategy.

Before we get into how to set up a plan that delivers these results and avoids errors, let’s look at some misconceptions about blog syndication and the differences between this strategy, guest posting, and syndication networks.

Blog Syndication vs. Guest Posting

A content syndication strategy may sound similar to guest blogging outreach. In both strategies, you create content and find other sites that will publish it on their site. But these two strategies are not the same.

  • With guest posting, a blog post only appears on one guest blogging site. It does not appear on your website at all. Also, a guest post is usually original content.
  • With content syndication, a blog post appears on your site. It also appears on one or more other sites. Unlike guest posting, syndicated content is an original piece that has been republished.

Blog syndication uses republished content that appears on one or more sites. Guest posting is usually original content that is published on one other site.

Blog Syndication vs. Syndication Networks

Another blurry line in content syndication relates to paid content syndication. While the two strategies sound the same, there are some major differences.

  • Syndicating content involves creating relationships with individual websites and working with them to publish your content on their site. In this strategy, the website publishes your content in its entirety, usually at no cost to you.
  • Working with syndication networks involves partnering with a company that advertises your content (usually by showing your article’s headline, a blurb, and featured image) on other third-party websites. The advertised content leads back to a blog post on your site, and you typically pay based on how many clicks your ad receives. The top syndicated content providers include Outbrain, SimpleReach, and Taboola, and you can usually find these ads at the bottom of popular blogs and websites.

Content Syndication Example – Syndicated Network Ads

Blog Syndication Best Practices

Now that you know what blog syndication is, what it’s not, and how it can support your content and marketing plan, let’s look at what it takes to properly execute this strategy.

It’s essential to follow these best practices so that you reap the benefits of content syndication while avoiding the negatives that can come from a poorly constructed strategy.

Syndicate your content on sites that have more online authority than you. One of the primary goals of blog syndication is to get your content in front of new audiences. You want to seed your content on sites that have the potential to reach more people than the content on your site can. So target sites that have a big audience and high Alexa Rank as they will have a large reach. (Also, getting highquality backlinks from authoritative sites also comes with the added benefit of improved SEO for your site.)

Only syndicate your content on sites that reach your target audience. Reaching a lot of people is important, but not as important as reaching the right people. Only syndicate your content on websites that reach your ideal target market.


Reaching a lot of people is important, but not as important as reaching the right people.
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Publish the original post on your site first. To get the most benefit out of blog syndication, publish the content on your site first so that your site is recognized as the original publisher. This is important for supporting strong SEO signals and building backlinks.

blog syndication attribution

Ask syndication sites to link back to the original post on your site. A part of the reason why you should publish content on your site first is that you want to link back to the original post in the syndicated piece of content. This leads audiences back to your site and sends positive SEO signals to search engines. As a best practice, link back to the original content on your site, not your main URL or another page. This is one of the top off-page SEO techniques for boosting your visibility in search.

Ask syndication sites to use a rel=canonical tag. To get SEO benefits from blog syndication (and avoid search engine penalties), follow duplicate content best practices. When content is published on your site first, ask the site that is republishing the content to include a rel=canonical tag that points back to the original content on your site. This process tells search engines that you know the content is duplicated and that your post is the original. It prevents search penalties (that can be applied to sites that “steal” content), and it can boost your site’s SEO.

If they don’t use a rel=canonical tag, ask them to use a Noindex tag. If the publishing site doesn’t want to add a rel=canonical tag, the next best thing is to ask them to use a Noindex tag. Noindex is a type of meta tag SEO  that tells search engines not to index a page. When this tag is used, it doesn’t give as much SEO benefit to your site, but it does help avoid duplicate content issues. 

Pro Tip: Use a duplicate content checker to make sure your site doesn’t have any copied content problems.

Start relationships by guest posting. Rather than reaching right out to websites and asking if they’d like to syndicate your blog posts, take time to build the relationship. Start by submitting an original guest post that is written for their audience. This approach is a good way to start the relationship by showing the level of content you create and how your content can appeal to the site’s current audience.

Find the Best Blog Syndication Sites for Your Content

Use these tips to find the best blog syndication sites to use in your content strategy.

Find sites that share your audience. To find sites that share your audience or the audience you want to attract, use Alexa’s Audience Overlap Tool. Enter the URL of up to 10 sites that have your target audience and produce a report of many other similar websites. Use this map as a starting point for finding sites to target in your content syndication strategy.

find sites for blog syndication

Search for sites that accept syndicated content. Your outreach will be more successful if you reach out to sites that have accepted syndicated content in the past. Look at sites before you contact them to find out if they have previously published syndicated content. Try searching for [“originally appeared on” + website URL] to see if they have posts that are syndicated.

Google and the Google logo are registered trademarks of Google LLC, used with permission.

Find sites that already link to your competitors. Other sites that will be likely to syndicate your content and link back to you are sites that have already done the same for your competitors. To find sites that link to your competitors, use Alexa’s Competitor Backlink Checker. Enter up to 10 of your competitors to see a list of URLs and sites that link to each.

blog syndication links

Pitch content that benefits the target site. To make your blog syndication offer impossible for publishers to refuse, pitch topics that fill content gaps on their site. A content gap is a topic or idea that the publisher’s competitors have covered but the target publisher has not. To find these gaps, use Alexa’s Competitive Keyword Matrix. Enter the target site along with a few of their competitors, select to view the organic “Keyword Gaps” for the target site, and run the tool.

content opportunities for blog syndication

The report will show keywords that are driving traffic to competitors but not the target site, giving you a list of topics that you can pitch to the publisher. Develop ideas based on these keywords and explain to the publisher why they are good posts for their site to improve your chances of approval.

content syndication strategy ideas

Get Tools to Support Your Blog Syndication Strategy

Blog syndication is a smart way to get more out of the work you’ve already done. By publishing content on your site and then republishing it again on other high-quality sites that share your audience, you can get in front of new audiences and gain additional SEO benefits all while leveraging assets you already have.

Use the tips in this post to launch your blog syndication plan and start getting extra exposure for your content today. To grow your strategy even faster, sign up for a free trial of Alexa’s Advanced Plan to gain access to all of the research tools mentioned in this post.

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Your Complete Guide to Retention Marketing https://blog.alexa.com/retention-marketing/ https://blog.alexa.com/retention-marketing/#respond Thu, 27 Sep 2018 14:45:07 +0000 https://blog.alexa.com/?p=6230 When we think about marketing, our minds often jump to lead generation tactics that attract new customers. But marketing isn’t only about bringing in new business. It’s also about keeping existing customers through retention marketing. In fact, customer retention might be even more important than customer acquisition. Let’s look at why this might be true, [...]

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8 minute read

When we think about marketing, our minds often jump to lead generation tactics that attract new customers. But marketing isn’t only about bringing in new business. It’s also about keeping existing customers through retention marketing.

In fact, customer retention might be even more important than customer acquisition. Let’s look at why this might be true, and how you can use retention marketing to increase revenue while spending fewer resources on marketing.


Customer retention might be even more important than customer acquisition.
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What is Retention Marketing?

Retention marketing is a strategy that markets to existing customers. It focuses on bringing back customers who have already done business with a brand and keeping customers who are already connected to a brand through a recurring subscription or membership.

Let’s look at how this retention marketing definition fits into the final stages of customer lifecycle marketing.

At the beginning of the lifecycle, acquisition marketing builds brand awareness, attracts attention, educates audiences, and eventually converts people into buyers. At the end of the lifecycle, retention marketing either brings the buyer back into the purchase funnel if they have jumped ship, or nurtures them in the cycle as an active, engaged customer.

The goals of retention marketing aren’t to increase the number of customers but rather to:

  • Increase customer return rates and bring past customers back into the buying cycle.
  • Decrease customer churn rates and keep existing customers in the buying cycle.
  • Drive purchase frequency and get customers to enter the buying cycle more often.

A few retention marketing examples could be a paid gaming app that sends a free life to a player who hasn’t logged into the app for a few days or an online retailer who sends a previous customer a curated list of items they may like based on their recent purchase. Encouraging a customer to upgrade their service is another example of successful retention marketing.

Why Retention Marketing is a Smart Strategy

For new and growing brands, it makes sense to focus most of their marketing plans on customer acquisition. But once a brand has a solid customer base, they need to shift their strategy and put more attention into customer retention.

Without a retention plan, all of the marketing strategies in the acquisition phase are for naught. A brand may work hard to get customers, but then lose them by failing to re-engage and remarket to them. This loss of customers is a costly mistake, as retention marketing is proven to boost revenue while using fewer resources than acquisition marketing.

Keeping existing customers increases profits. It pays off to keep customers around. Increasing customer retention rates by only 5% can increase profits by 25 to 95%.


Increasing customer retention rates by only 5% can increase profits by as much as 95%.
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Selling to existing customers is easier than selling to new customers. Brands have a 60% to 70% chance of selling to an existing customer versus only a 5% to 20% chance of selling to a new customer.

Every time a customer buys from you, the odds that they return go up. After one purchase, a customer has a 27% chance of returning to your store. If they make a second or third purchase, that number increases to a 54% chance of making another purchase.

It costs less to attract existing customers than to attract new customers. It can cost up to 5x more to acquire a new customer than to keep an existing one.

Existing customers are likely to spend more. People who have already bought from your brand are more likely to return and spend more money when they do. Existing customers may spend up to 67% more on their purchase than new customers.

Happy, existing customers help you acquire new customers. When you have happy brand fans, they turn into brand advocates. This helps lead other customers to your business because customers often trust and take recommendations from friends.

Customer Retention Metrics

Now that you know the benefits of retention marketing, let’s look at some of the metrics you need to know to launch a customer retention campaign of your own.

Customer Churn Rate

Customer churn is the rate at which customers stop doing business with you. This number helps you see the rate at which you lose customers. You can measure churn rates over various amounts of time, but it’s most often measured on an annual basis.  

Find It: (Number of Customers at Start of Year – Number of Customers at End of Year) / Number of Customers at Start of Year

Revenue Churn Rate

Revenue churn rate is the percentage of revenue you lose as a result of existing customers canceling a service with your business. This is mostly relevant to SaaS and subscription businesses, as it helps them see the revenue they lose as a result of customers deactivating their accounts. In the equation, MRR is monthly recurring revenue.

Find It: (MRR Lost From Existing Customers During Month – New MRR Gained From Existing Customers During Month] / MRR From Existing Customers at Start of Month

Repeat Purchase Rate

The repeat purchase rate is the percentage of your customers who have bought from your brand more than once. It helps you see how many of your customers are returning back to your business.

Find It: Number of Returning Customers/Number of Total Customers

Return Website Visitors

Repeat visitors are the number of website visitors who have been to your website before. While this number doesn’t necessarily represent how many return customers you have, it can be helpful for determining how much of your audience is regularly engaged with your brand.

Find It: Use web analytics on your website and refer to new vs. returning visitor audience data to find this information.

Customer Lifetime Value (CLV)

CLV is the value that a customer gives to your brand over their lifetime of doing business with you. This number doesn’t help you assess your customer retention, but it can help you put a value on your retention marketing, as it shows how valuable it is to keep a customer around.

Find It: Figuring out the customer lifetime value is dependent on your business model. Use this guide to help you calculate it.

Net Promoter Score® (NPS)

A Net Promoter Score® helps you see how likely your customers are to refer someone to your business. To find this number, you have to survey your customers and ask them to answer the following question on a one to 10 scale, “How likely are you to recommend our company to a friend or colleague?” From their responses, you can calculate the number of promoters, passives, and detractors you have. Then you can use the formula to determine your Net Promoter Score®.

  • Promoters: Customers who answer the question with 9-10
  • Passives: Customers who answer the question with 7-8
  • Detractors: Customers who answer the question with 0-6

Find It: Percentage of Promoters – Percentage of Detractors

4 Types of Retention Marketing Campaigns

As you start to put together ideas for retention marketing plans, consider launching one or more of following types of campaigns.

  • Onboarding Campaigns: Design a system for welcoming and nurturing new customers and clients that gets them to the “WOW” moment. Create an amazing first impression that will stay with customers and keep them coming back.
  • Active Customer Campaigns: Don’t forget about customers who are regularly coming back to your brand. It’s important to create strategies to continue to connect with and educate these dedicated customers, even if they seem like they aren’t going anywhere.
  • Lapsing Customer Campaigns: Create campaigns specifically designed for customers who appear to be on their way out of the buyer’s cycle. These customers may be people with accounts or free trial offers that are about to expire.
  • Re-Engagement Campaigns: A “lost” customer could be someone who opted out of a paid subscription or hasn’t returned to your business for more than a year. A re-engagement campaign works to pull them back in.

Retention Marketing Best Practices

Keep the following best practices in mind as you craft your customer retention strategies.

Don’t accept high churn rates as a given.

A mistake that many brands and marketers make is tracking customer churn rates but not doing anything about it.  Many believe the churn rate is nothing more than a factor to consider in their financial projections. Don’t make this mistake. Track your customer churn rate, and then develop retention marketing strategies for decreasing it. Don’t just accept it as a static statistic in your business.

Collect customer data.

To remarket to your customers, you first have to know who they are. Use a client relationship management system to create profiles for your customer and collect information about who they are, how they act, and how you can reach them. Develop a system that collects customer contact information and data about their brand interactions (what they buy, how often they buy, and when they last engaged with your brand).

Put customer data to use.

Once you start collecting customer data, use that data to create strategic remarketing and retention marketing plans. Segment your lists, and use what you know about your customers to create lists based on characteristics and brand habits. Targeting in marketing helps you use the demographic and psychographic segmentation information you collect to send content, offers, and messaging based on what you know about customers. You can segment audiences based on brand engagement and past purchase history to provide suggestions for new purchases and options for cross-sells and upsells.

Provide top-notch brand experiences.

No amount of retention marketing is going to bring back a customer if they had a negative experience with a business the first time around.  It’s essential to provide exceptional customer experiences to keep customers coming back for more.

  • Deliver on what you promise. Never oversell or overhype the products and services you offer.
  • Personalize the process. Use the customer’s name whenever you can to add a level of personalization to the experience.
  • Focus on customer service. The customer experience doesn’t end once buyers make a purchase. Provide follow-up service and solutions that help customers past the checkout.

Focus on attracting the right customers.

An important part of customer retention actually happens in the customer acquisition phase. For you to retain customers, you need to attract the right customers in the first place.  These ideal customers are a perfect fit for your brand. They have a need for what you sell, and they also align with your brand’s values. To ensure that you attract the best customers from the start, create a detailed buyer persona that outlines exactly who your brand wants to pull into the purchase funnel.

For help with this process, use these sites for market research and our buyer persona template to get started.

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Keep up your brand visibility.

To increase the chances that an existing customer will return or stick with your business, keep your brand at the top of their mind. Show up where your audience spends time. Outside of your own platforms and media, seed your content in other places where your audience will find it. Look for guest blogging opportunities that allow you to get your brand name in front of your target market, and do a competitor keyword analysis to target top keywords your audience is using in search.

Focus on early customer engagement.

Don’t disappear once a customer makes a purchase. Once you make an impression on your audience, stay visible. After you send a welcome email keep a consistent presence with an informative email drip series, newsletters, or product announcements.

Make brand engagements fun and rewarding.

Give your customers and audience a reason to return to your brand. Provide customer loyalty programs that offer rewards and prizes for continued support of your business. Also, incorporate gamification elements that make customers want to come back and earn status points and exclusive offers.

Regularly survey your customers.

A consistent part of your marketing objectives should be surveying your customers. The best way to understand how to better serve (and keep) customers is by asking them what they like, want, and need. Give your customers an opportunity to share their experiences with your brand, so you can find ways to improve the customer process as well as your products and services.

Support Retention Marketing with Strategic Data

Acquisition marketing is what pulls audiences into your purchase funnel and drives them into becoming new customers and buyers. This is an important part of marketing, but it’s just the beginning.

You also need to use retention marketing to keep customers in the buyer’s cycle and encourage them to return again and again. Focusing on the full customer lifecycle is how your brand will increase revenue while expending fewer resources, money, and time.

Use the tactics and tips in this post to leverage your existing customer base to grow your revenue. And get more help with planning strategic, holistic marketing campaigns by signing up for a free trial of Alexa’s Advanced Plan. Our competitor, SEO, and content research tools will help you set up smart campaigns for your entire customer lifecycle marketing plans.

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29 Market Research Questions to Guide Your Marketing Strategy https://blog.alexa.com/market-research-questions/ https://blog.alexa.com/market-research-questions/#respond Thu, 20 Sep 2018 20:19:43 +0000 https://blog.alexa.com/?p=6212 One of the best ways to learn about your market and customers is by asking questions. When you ask the right market research questions, you can identify opportunities to improve in your marketing strategy, operations, and industry. You can gain insights that help you: Attract your target audience Stand out from competitors Improve your products [...]

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3 minute read

One of the best ways to learn about your market and customers is by asking questions. When you ask the right market research questions, you can identify opportunities to improve in your marketing strategy, operations, and industry.

You can gain insights that help you:

  • Attract your target audience
  • Stand out from competitors
  • Improve your products and services
  • Better serve your customers

To ask the best questions, it helps to break down your market research questions into the following categories:

  • Market research questions
  • Questions to ask your target market
  • Questions to ask your customers
  • Questions for competitive analysis

Some market research questions will require research to find the answers. For example, you may want to know, “How do our competitors drive traffic?” Other questions you can directly ask your customers. For those questions, you can survey or interview customers to find answers and insights.

Here some examples of questions you can ask for each type of marketing research.

Market Research Questions

General market research aims to help you learn about your market size and potential to connect with customers. Great qualitative market research questions include:

  • How big is our potential market?
  • Will this market grow or shrink in the future?
  • What other products and services are similar to ours?
  • Who are our top competitors?
  • What market share do our competitors own?
  • What share is available for us to own/take?

To find answers to these questions, use sites for market research that help you find information on geographic locations, industry competitors, and economic conditions.

Market Research Questions to Ask Your Target Market

Questions to ask your target market include demographic market research questions that help you get to know who your customers are. Here are some examples:

  • What is your age?
  • What is your gender?
  • What is your education level?
  • Where do you live?
  • What is your profession?
  • What is your household income?
  • What is your household size?

These questions can go deeper and uncover psychographic segmentation details that help you learn about the interests, attitudes, and needs of your customers. Examples of these questions include:

  • What are your hobbies and interests?
  • Where do you spend your free time?
  • What are your biggest challenges?
  • What are your primary goals?
  • What is most important to you?
  • Where do you go for information?
  • How do you like to make purchases?

To gather these details, you can survey or interview your customers. You can also use Alexa’s Site Overview Tool and Audience Overlap Tool to discover insights about who your customers are, what sites they visit, and what interests them.

Market Research Questions to Ask Customers

Existing customers can provide great insight about your business, products, and services. Market research questions to ask clients or customers include:

  • How likely are you to recommend our brand to a friend?
  • How long have you been a customer?
  • What problem does [product/service] solve for you?
  • How does the [product/service] fit into your daily workflow?
  • How well does [product/service] meet your needs?
  • What do you wish the [product/service] had that it currently does not?
  • What do you like [most/least] about [product/service]?
  • What made you choose us over a competitor?
  • How would you rate your last experience with us?

You can gather this information through audience analysis, in-person interviews with your customers, or online customer surveys.

Pro Tip: It’s important to collect information from customers who are advocates of your product/service, but also those who did not have an agreeable experience. Asking infrequent or lost customers for their feedback is an excellent way to surface gaps in your product/service and identify opportunities for improvement.

Market Research Questions for Competitive Analysis

Once you assess your industry and customers, start asking market research questions about your competitors. Some questions to ask include:

  • How is our brand doing compared to our competitors?
  • How do our competitors effectively attract customers?
  • How much website traffic do our competitors receive?
  • Which keywords are driving traffic to our competitors?
  • What sources are driving traffic to our competitors?
  • How many inbound links do our competitors have?
  • What type of content is performing well for our competitors?

For tips on how to conduct a thorough competitive analysis, download our free competitive analysis template.

Our Competitive Keyword Matrix and Competitor Backlink Checker can also help you uncover useful data about your competition.


Asking questions is only half the process. Make sure you collect the most accurate, authentic answers.
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Get Better Answers to Your Market Research Questions

Asking the right market research questions helps you uncover insights to improve customer satisfaction, business operations, and marketing strategies. But asking questions is only half the process. You also need to make sure you’re collecting the most accurate and authentic answers.

Use the market research questions in this post to direct your inquiries to your business, customers, and industry. Then get additional tips in our post How to Do Market Research Better Than Your Competition, and sign up for a free trial of Alexa’s Advanced Plan to get access to a suite of competitor, industry, and audience insight to get access to a suite of competitor, industry, and audience insight tools to help you research.

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